Articles: How Democrats Killed Their Populist Soul; Reading Little House as an Adult

I don’t feel like doing an extensive Current Events Write-Up today, so I will just link to two articles that I found interesting.

The Atlantic: How Democrats Killed Their Populist Soul:In the 1970s, a new wave of post-Watergate liberals stopped fighting monopoly power. The result is an increasingly dangerous political system. Written by Matt Stoller.

This is a lengthy article, so I read it over the course of a month.  According to the article, a prominent plank among 1930’s New Deal Democrats was a commitment to anti-trust policies: smaller business is better than big business.  In the 1960’s, however, economist and Kennedy advisor John Kenneth Galbraith expressed hope that monopolies could promote social justice.  During the 1970’s, when Democrats were elected to Congress in the aftermath of Watergate, many of these Democrats rejected the populist anti-trust beliefs of the 1930’s Democrats.  Bill Clinton would amplify this 1970’s non-populist stance as President.

Book Riot: Reading “Little House on the Prairie” as an Adult, by Kelly Jensen.

I’ve been watching the Little House TV series lately.  I was wondering if I would enjoy the books.  From this post, the impression that I get is that the books are not like the TV series!  I’d still like to read them for myself, sometime.

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About jamesbradfordpate

My name is James Pate. I study the History of Biblical Interpretation at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati, Ohio, as part of its Ph.D. program. I have an M.A. in Hebrew Bible from Jewish Theological Seminary, an M.Div. from Harvard Divinity School, and a B.A. from DePauw University. This blog is about my journey. I read books. I watch movies and TV shows. I go to church. I try to find meaning. And, when I can’t do that, I just talk about stuff that I find interesting.
This entry was posted in Current Events, Little House, Political Philosophy, Politics, Television. Bookmark the permalink.

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