Bobby Grow: Are ‘Good Works’ Required in order to ‘Posses’ or ‘Attain’ Eternal Life? That’s What John Piper, the Post Reformed Orthodox, and the Classical Reformed in General Believe

I am going to have to do my best to contain myself in this post; I haven’t been irked like this in a long while—maybe it’s because I haven’t been paying attention to it as much as I used to. What I am referring to is how ‘good works’ are considered necessary if someone is […]

via Are ‘Good Works’ Required in order to ‘Posses’ or ‘Attain’ Eternal Life? That’s What John Piper, the Post Reformed Orthodox, and the Classical Reformed in General Believe — The Evangelical Calvinist

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About jamesbradfordpate

My name is James Pate. I study the History of Biblical Interpretation at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati, Ohio, as part of its Ph.D. program. I have an M.A. in Hebrew Bible from Jewish Theological Seminary, an M.Div. from Harvard Divinity School, and a B.A. from DePauw University. This blog is about my journey. I read books. I watch movies and TV shows. I go to church. I try to find meaning. And, when I can’t do that, I just talk about stuff that I find interesting.
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One Response to Bobby Grow: Are ‘Good Works’ Required in order to ‘Posses’ or ‘Attain’ Eternal Life? That’s What John Piper, the Post Reformed Orthodox, and the Classical Reformed in General Believe

  1. M. Ferris says:

    I have encountered this somewhat recently, in reading Bradley G. Green’s “Covenant and Commandment: Works, obedience and faithfulness in the Christian life.” I agree with quite a bit of what Green writes, but occasionally have doubts and questions on some points. This is one of them. Green, too, presents works as in some fashion necessary to salvation. He cites a fair number of scholars, older and current, to bolster the view. One example is John Owen, whom he quotes as saying, “The continuation of our justification depends on our own obedience and good works.” but also, “A justified state is inconsistent with the neglect of them [good works].”

    These are two very different things, to my mind. To say that we continue in a justified state by our obedience is to make justification dependent on myself, despite caveats that it is a Spirit-endowed obedience. The current uproar is evidence, I suppose, that insisting justification is by faith alone – yet still requires our efforts – has proven a difficult tightrope to walk.

    The other statement, that neglect of good works is inconsistent with a justified state, is but a different way of exhorting believers to put off the old man, put on the new, to become what we are. That is not at all the same as saying we continue in a state of justification by our works. John Piper and Thomas Schreiner are both careful students of Scripture, so I don’t wish to cast aspersions without reading the primary source material, but I would say that I share some of Bobby Grow’s concerns about where this may lead.

    Liked by 1 person

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