Daily Archives: March 19, 2010

Irenaeus on Eschatology

In my reading today of Manlio Simonetti’s Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church, I was intrigued by the following statement, which discusses Irenaeus: Pages 23-24: So too the unjust judge of Lk. 18:2ff. is also seen as a figure of … Continue reading

Posted in Bible, Religion

Motherly Mediator, Lonely God, God’s Mother

In Marvin Pope’s Song of Songs, three items stood out to me.  Pope is talking mostly about the Kabbalah, a work of Jewish mysticism: 1.  Page 162-163: The issue of polytheism versus monotheism which exercised the intellectuals did not greatly … Continue reading

Posted in Bible, Religion

Feminine Mystique 9

In my reading today of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique (1963), I read most of “The Sex Seekers.”  Ms. Friedan’s thesis is that full-time homemakers are pursuing sexual adventure outside of their marriage because of their boredom with being housewives.  … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Women's History Month

Our Roots and Our Past, Hodgepodge or Contribution?

1.  H.I. Marrou, A History of Education in Antiquity (pages 309-310): Whether the emperor or someone else was in power, his first aim was always to serve and preserve the Roman Empire, the Roman idea; and this, I repeat, was … Continue reading

Posted in Bible, Religion

Sorcery, Fess Parker, Why I Am a Christian

1.  In John Van Seters’ A Law Book for the Diaspora, something on page 103 stood out to me: Laws against [sorcery] occur in both the Hammurapi Code (LH 2) and the Middle Assyrian Laws (MAL A 47), with a … Continue reading

Posted in Bible, Deaths, Life, Religion, Television

Feminine Mystique 8

Today, in Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique (1963), I read the rest of “The Sexual Sell,” which is about advertisements’ promotion of the Feminine Mystique, the notion that women can only find fulfillment as wives and mothers.  Ms. Friedan’s points … Continue reading

Posted in Women's History Month

(Imaginary) Legal Mind-Games

H.I. Marrou, A History of Education in Antiquity (page 287). Marrou talks about “imaginary laws” that Roman students in higher education had to discuss.  I gather that these were brain exercises, or opportunities for them to show off their rhetoric! … Continue reading

Posted in Bible, Greco-Roman, Rabbinics, Religion